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Bernie Sanders decided to print out a big ol’ copy of a Donald Trump tweet and bring it to the floor of the United States Senate. As we noted earlier today, Bernie was using the tweet to illustrate Trump’s prior commitment against cutting Medicare and Medicaid.

As we noted earlier today, Bernie was using the tweet to illustrate Trump’s prior commitment against cutting Medicare and Medicaid. “If he was sincere, then I would hope that tomorrow or maybe today he could send out a tweet and tell his Republican colleagues to stop wasting their time and all of our time,” he said.

On Wednesday afternoon, Bernie Sanders decided to print out a big ol’ copy of a Donald Trump tweet and bring it to the floor of the United States Senate.

But while it was an entertaining stunt, the tweet certainly wasn’t the most amusing poster Bernie could have brought out—indeed, it wasn’t even the best Trump tweet he could have picked. (That would be this one.)

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The incident happened during a debate about the repeal of Obamacare.

This is a galaxy

Your bones don’t break, mine do. That’s clear. Your cells react to bacteria and viruses differently than mine. You don’t get sick, I do. That’s also clear. But for some reason, you and I react the exact same way to water. We swallow it too fast, we choke. We get some in our lungs, we drown. However unreal it may seem, we are connected, you and I. We’re on the same curve, just on opposite ends.

But while it was an entertaining stunt, the tweet certainly wasn’t the most amusing poster Bernie could have brought out—indeed, it wasn’t even the best Trump tweet he could have picked.

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Well, the way they make shows is, they make one show. That show’s called a pilot. Then they show that show to the people who make shows, and on the strength of that one show they decide if they’re going to make more shows. Some pilots get picked and become television programs. Some don’t, become nothing. She starred in one of the ones that became nothing.

Your bones don’t break, mine do. That’s clear. Your cells react to bacteria and viruses differently than mine. You don’t get sick, I do. That’s also clear. But for some reason, you and I react the exact same way to water. We swallow it too fast, we choke. We get some in our lungs, we drown. However unreal it may seem, we are connected, you and I. We’re on the same curve, just on opposite ends.

By the ‘40s, Universal really started cashing in on the interconnected worlds of these monsters by having them show up in movies together, starting with 1943's Frankenstein Meets the Wolfman. Crossover sequels, including the significantly less serious Abbott and Costello Meet Insert Monster Here series, kept the series going into the ‘50s, until Universal went on a break from monster movies.

This history should mean that Universal has a great well to tap when creating its new, very poorly named Dark Universe. And yet Universal has stumbled twice out of the gate. It first tried to launch this new universe with 2014's Dracula Untold, which ended by showing Vlad/Dracula in the present day. That’s fodder for a sequel and puts Vlad where he could conceivably meet up with the characters in this year’s Mummy.

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Now that we know who you are, I know who I am. I’m not a mistake! It all makes sense! In a comic, you know how you can tell who the arch-villain’s going to be? He’s the exact opposite of the hero. And most times they’re friends, like you and me! I should’ve known way back when... You know why, David? Because of the kids. They called me Mr Glass.

My money’s in that office, right? If she start giving me some bullshit about it ain’t there, and we got to go someplace else and get it, I’m gonna shoot you in the head then and there. Then I’m gonna shoot that bitch in the kneecaps, find out where my goddamn money is. She gonna tell me too. Hey, look at me when I’m talking to you, motherfucker. You listen: we go in there, and that nigga Winston or anybody else is in there, you the first motherfucker to get shot. You understand?

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The Mummy’s also got a bad case of shared universitis. Universal wants a shared universe so badly that it’s added a secret society of monster hunters headed up by Russell Crowe as Dr. Jekyll.


No one is willing to be patient. The original monster movies were just good movies first. The crossovers came more than a decade after the first film and were, quite frankly, not nearly as good as the standalone movies. The Mummy’s split its focus and everything is worse as a result. What purpose does Jekyll Hydeing out in a Mummy movie serve?

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As cliched as the Marvel post-credits sequences are, the reason they worked so well—especially in the beginning—was because the most explicit call forward was done after the film. The story of the standalone film was untouched.

This movie completely misses why mummies became a classic monster in the first place. Which is a shame because there is a lot of good material to be resurrected. Just not by this mummy.


And yet, it’s Boris Karloff’s flat-headed, bolt-necked, green-skinned creature that pop culture remembers.

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Universal’s monster movies technically began in 1923 with The Hunchback of Notre Dame, but it was performances like Bela Lugosi’s 1931 turn as Dracula, Karloff’s 1931 Frankenstein, Claude Rains as the Invisible Man in 1933, and Lon Chaney Jr.’s Wolf Man that turned the monsters into icons.

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By the ‘40s, Universal really started cashing in on the interconnected worlds of these monsters by having them show up in movies together, starting with 1943's Frankenstein Meets the Wolfman. Crossover sequels, including the significantly less serious Abbott and Costello Meet Insert Monster Here series, kept the series going into the ‘50s, until Universal went on a break from monster movies.

This history should mean that Universal has a great well to tap when creating its new, very poorly named Dark Universe. And yet Universal has stumbled twice out of the gate. It first tried to launch this new universe with 2014's Dracula Untold, which ended by showing Vlad/Dracula in the present day. That’s fodder for a sequel and puts Vlad where he could conceivably meet up with the characters in this year’s Mummy.


Universal’s monster movies technically began in 1923 with The Hunchback of Notre Dame, but it was performances like Bela Lugosi’s 1931 turn as Dracula, Karloff’s 1931 Frankenstein, Claude Rains as the Invisible Man in 1933, and Lon Chaney Jr.’s Wolf Man that turned the monsters into icons.

Advertisement

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By the ‘40s, Universal really started cashing in on the interconnected worlds of these monsters by having them show up in movies together, starting with 1943's Frankenstein Meets the Wolfman. Crossover sequels, including the significantly less serious Abbott and Costello Meet Insert Monster Here series, kept the series going into the ‘50s, until Universal went on a break from monster movies.

This history should mean that Universal has a great well to tap when creating its new, very poorly named Dark Universe. And yet Universal has stumbled twice out of the gate. It first tried to launch this new universe with 2014's Dracula Untold, which ended by showing Vlad/Dracula in the present day. That’s fodder for a sequel and puts Vlad where he could conceivably meet up with the characters in this year’s Mummy.


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Deadspin

Fusion

Gizmodo

Jalopnik

Jezebel

Kotaku

Lifehacker

The Root

Kinja (w/o image)

But while it was an entertaining stunt, the tweet certainly wasn’t the most amusing poster Bernie could have brought out—indeed, it wasn’t even the best Trump tweet he could have picked. (That would be this one.)